Cantate (Easter 5), 2020

Here our true Paschal Lamb we see,
Whom God so freely gave us;
He died on the accursèd tree—
So strong His love—to save us.
See, His blood now marks our door;
Faith points to it; death passes o’er,
And Satan cannot harm us.
Alleluia!

God is always doing the same things.

He hasn’t always done them in the same way, but He’s always been doing the same things.

Before His crucifixion, death, resurrection, and ascension, Jesus defines the work of God like this: “It is to your advantage that I go away, for if I do not go away, the Helper will not come to you. But if I go, I will send him to you. And when he comes, he will convict the world concerning sin and righteousness and judgment” (John 16:7-8).

God has always been convicting the world concerning sin and righteousness and judgment. That’s a perfect summary of everything that God has done, is doing, and will do.

When the Scriptures teach that God is love or that God is slow to anger or merciful—though it may sound strange to our ears—that’s just another way of saying that God convicts the world concerning sin and righteousness and judgment.

But we must reconcile the fact that those things appear and are received and understood very differently by different people.

God is always doing the same thing.

But not everyone believes or understands it.

We know, from practical experience, that “mercy” doesn’t always mean “nice” and that what is merciful to one may not be merciful to another.

If an animal is suffering terribly, it might be the merciful thing to put it down or have it put down. As stewards of God’s creation, created in God’s image, we tend to what He’s given us.

But if another steward is suffering terribly, it’s merciful to bear with him in his suffering, to remind him of the truth of the love of God.

That may not alleviate the suffering of this life, but it most certainly helps prepare for the life to come.

God is always doing the same thing—He’s always preparing us for the life to come. And you will enter into everlasting life well-prepared—or not. You will enter into everlasting peace—or not.

God works to the end that you would be prepared for the end.

Still, we must reconcile the fact that what God does is received and understood very differently.

Jesus says, “[The Holy Spirit will convict the world] concerning sin, because they do not believe in me; concerning righteousness, because I go to the Father, and you will see me no longer; concerning judgment, because the ruler of this world is judged” (John 16:9-11).

In the Inn and House of the Church, in the Ark of the One True Faith, God is saving the world.

He causes the world to be convicted of sin. He melts our hearts of stone by the dirge of His Law.

The contrite bones that God has broken rejoice, and our merciful Lord remembers our sin no more.

The Holy Spirit is at work in the Word of God proclaimed to convict the world concerning sin. Not that the world would be condemned but that—through Christ—the world would be saved.

The Holy Spirit is at work in the Word of God proclaimed to convict the world concerning righteousness.

The Lord is our righteousness, but we occasionally forget our fear of God, take His bountifulness for granted, and lean on our own understanding.

So our God and Lord has taught us to pray: Hallowed be Thy name to remind us all that God’s name is holy.

Your name may be holy in town. It may be written a dozen times in bronze. But it is the cruciform name of God—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—that saves.

Not yours.

All other names fail.

The Word of the Lord—His name and His righteousness—endures forever.

And the Holy Spirit is at work in the Word of God proclaimed to convict the world concerning judgment.

The ruler of this world is judged.

We’re not waiting to find out how it all ends. Law and Gospel is not a half-preached two-part sermon.

We know how it ends—that’s why we sometimes take God and the time of our visitation for granted, intentionally sinning a little, now and then, for the enjoyment of it, careful to think, in the back of our minds, that we can always repent later.

That foolish lack of urgency and preparation will surprise you when the watchmen on the heights are crying: “Awake, Jerusalem, arise!”

The ruler of this world is judged, and as soon as the last adult convert to Lutheranism confesses the faith, as soon as the last baby to be baptized receives the sign of the Holy Cross both upon his forehead and upon his heart to mark him as one redeemed by Christ the crucified, as soon as God saves the last name that’s written in the Book of Life, He won’t wait anymore.

Consider, now, the work and Word of God.

He convicts the world concerning sin, righteousness, and judgment.

In the Church, we hear His Word with joy.

We confess our sins, removing the plank from our own eye that we may then help our brother with the splinter in his.

We confess the faith. In our prayers, in hymns, and in daily conversations that may make that one grumpy, grouchy family member of yours a little more grumpy and grouchy.

We hear and believe the Gospel, and we receive both pardon and peace. In this life and in the life to come.

Inside the Church there is life.

But outside the Church, where the Word of God is trampled underfoot and snatched away by birds, where faith is scorched by the sun and choked out by weeds, outside the Church there’s only vanity leading to death.

God will send—into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels—all those who do not believe and live by faith in the Lord Jesus Christ.

Listen to these words again:

Here our true Paschal Lamb we see,
Whom God so freely gave us;
He died on the accursèd tree—
So strong His love—to save us.
See, His blood now marks our door;
Faith points to it; death passes o’er,
And Satan cannot harm us.
Alleluia!

Inside the house, the Old Testament Christians eat the lamb that was given for them, and they receive the full benefit and protection of that bloody sacrifice.

Death is swallowed up by death.

But outside the house, in unbelieving Egypt, a few die—but all are in peril.

All are reminded that there is a God who fights for His people.

“The word of the cross is folly to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God” (1 Corinthians 1:18).

God is always doing the same things.

Hear them—receive and believe them as He desires—and you will have peace—now and forever.

So feast on Christ this Easter day.
The Word of Grace has purged away
The old and evil leaven.
And all our souls upon Him feed
Christ is our food and drink indeed!
Faith lives upon no other.
Alleluia!

In Jesus’ name, Amen!

Cantate, 2020
John 16:5-15
Rev. Benjamin Tyler Holt

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